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The Ideal Candidate

Who we're looking for

No salon industry experience? No problem. Floyd’s 99 Barbershop isn’t seeking salon industry insiders to run our franchises; we’re seeking multi-brand franchisees and experienced entrepreneurs. The future for our barbershops lies in franchising, so we are committed to finding the right candidate.

ABOUT US

The Ideal Candidate

Who we're looking for

No salon industry experience? No problem. Floyd’s 99 Barbershop isn’t seeking salon industry insiders to run our franchises; we’re seeking multi-brand franchisees and experienced entrepreneurs. The future for our barbershops lies in franchising, so we are committed to finding the right candidate.

Download our Franchise Information Report

Floyd’s 99 Barbershop franchise is a great investment for restaurant operators and other experienced franchise owners

Today, the franchise partners in our chain of 120+ shops are a close-knit group. Most of them have multi-unit franchises and come from a variety of backgrounds, although we find the hospitality industry to be a particularly good fit.



Franchise candidates need a net worth of at least $1.5 million and liquid assets of $500,000 or more. We have a unique culture at Floyd’s 99, and we expect our franchise partners to be involved and engaged -- this is not an absentee model.

Multi-unit franchise owner Bob Gregg, who along with partner Courtney Lindley owns around 20 Floyd’s shops that are open or in development in Texas, says entrepreneurs have to stay engaged to maximize their opportunities for success. For Lindley and Gregg, that means “just living the culture every day in our shops. We're present and active inside our business every day.

“At the end of the day, the output is we're cutting hair, but it's a people business and we have to put people first in that business,” says Gregg, who is also a multi-unit restaurant franchisee. “We have to be involved in it every day in order to know and understand the challenges that our people face in leading their teams, and then be able to develop and create the support that they need in order to be most successful.”

Franchisees can ‘make a difference every day’

Lindley and Gregg together created the franchise program at Potbelly Sandwich Shop and are still multi-unit franchise owners at a national chicken chain. They knew Floyd’s would be great from an investment standpoint, but they also saw something more.

It’s an intangible reward that goes beyond ROI but is still so interwoven that it speaks to the effects a franchise partner’s engagement can have on the bottom line. Lindley and Gregg loved the family-oriented culture at Floyd’s 99 and have instilled that in their employees. “So that way, everybody fundamentally believes no matter what we're going through, we all are there together.

“We're all fighting the same fight… And they know we've got their best interests at heart. If you educate, stay involved and stay connected through communication, we win. It's when you're an absentee owner or there's no leadership and culture, that's when you miss. It has to be about culture and creating a connected environment to the stylist. That is number one in everything that we stand for, who we are, what we do. And when you've got that, you truly have a family environment that is who we are fundamentally, and that's the conversation that we're constantly having.”



“My business partner, Bob, and I had been clients of Floyd's 99, and I've always loved the business model,” he says. “And I always look for things where we can make a difference every day. And I knew that for us, creating a leadership dynamic and creating a true family and team, we could impact stylists' and barbers' lives.”

Foodservice franchisees find a perfect fit

Justin Micatrotto of Las Vegas was in restaurant franchising for 15 years before signing a multi-unit agreement with Floyd’s 99. One of the things he found so appealing was the similarity between the two industries.

“I think hospitality is hospitality,” he says. “Really, 60% to 75%, you could argue, of the interaction with us is in regards to hospitality touchpoints, as opposed to the technical side. The conversations that you're having, the confirmations, the appointment-setting -- none of that has to do with hair-cutting.

“So I think that's very similar to the restaurant industry in that regard. It's just the amount of touch points and where you can inject hospitality into it."

Gregg finds a lot of satisfaction in his role overseeing day-to-day operations and believes that staying engaged is key to his and his partner’s success. “I think that you have to want to be involved in the people business. If you want to own a barbershop or salon as something that will generate revenue for you without being intimately involved with the people, then this is not the right brand and concept for you.”
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